Animal Airwaves—Live

Animal Airwaves–Live is an hour-long call-in show that airs between 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. on Saturdays on WUFT-FM in Gainesville. The show features faculty members from the UF Veterinary Hospitals who address a variety of topics relating to pet health care, including companion animals, exotic pets and horses. Call in your questions to 352-392-8989 during the show or email questions about whatever topic is being discussed that day to animalairwaves@wuft.org.

Listeners can also tune into the show online for live streaming during the broadcast at: http://www.wuftfm.org/stream/

Note: While we will do everything possible to feature the designated speakers each week, there may be times when our veterinarians will be called away to care for a patient, in which case we will have a back-up speaker available to answer your calls.

Learn more about the UF Veterinary Hospitals by visiting www.vethospitals.ufl.edu

September 13, 2014:“What to Know When Adopting a Pet” (Archive First Aired 6/23/2012)

Speaker: Dr. Wendy Mandese

Have you considered offering a forever home to a new pet? Most people have, but the success of that new relationship is largely a function of responsible pet ownership and awareness of what’s involved in making that commitment. There’s much to consider, from your own lifestyle and the type or breed of pet that would work best for your family’s needs, to adapting your environment to make room for the new furry family member. Dr. Wendy Mandese, a primary care veterinarian at UF, will address what you need to know and how to prepare before you buy or adopt a new pet.

 

September 6, 2014: “Health Care for Goats” (Archive First Aired 6/8/2013)

Speaker: Dr. Sarah Reuss

Goats are used to clear brush, provide meat and milk and produce fiber for clothing in many developing countries. They also very playful and affectionate, and can often be great pets. While goats can be used to clear brush from your yard, the popular idea that goats can eat anything, including tin cans, is false. Goats are treated at UF’s Large Animal Hospital Hospital every week for diseases such as parasites, urinary tract blockages and problems relating to pregnancy. Dr. Sarah Reuss, a large animal medicine specialist, will discuss these common ailments and important things to know about goat health.

August 30, 2014: “Surprising Household Dangers to Your Pet” (Archive First Aired 2/15/14)

Speaker: Dr. Bobbi Conner

Poisonous plants, dangerous foods and drinks, treacherous toys  — all of these household items can post life-threatening hazards to pets. Some potential dangers are more common knowledge than others, however. Dr. Bobbi Conner, an emergency care specialist, will discuss surprising potential dangers that can be found around the house, what you can do to keep these threats at bay, signs to look for if your pet t has encountered something toxic in the home environment and why immediate contact with your veterinarian is critical if this occurs.

 

August 23, 2014:  “Arthritis in Pets: Prevention, Recognition and Treatment” Archive First Aired: January 4, 2014

Speaker: Dr. Stan Kim

Pets suffer from osteoarthritis, just as people do. In fact, veterinarians say arthritis is one of the most underdiagnosed conditions in their profession. Although the joint damage caused by arthritis can’t be reversed, the condition can be treated. As is the case with many diseases, however, early diagnosis is key. Dr. Stan Kim, an orthopedic surgery specialist, discusses how pet owners can in some cases prevent the disease from occurring in the first place,  how to recognize signs of arthritis in your pet, when it’s time to call your veterinarian and what can be done in veterinary medicine these days to treat the condition.

August 16, 2014: “Degenerative mitral valve disease”

Speaker: Dr. Simon Swift

Does your dog have a heart murmur?If so, it may well have a leaking valve. Degenerative mitral valve disease is the most common heart disease in dogs. Veterinary cardiology specialist Dr. Simon Swift will discuss disease symptoms, treatment best practices and more with a focus on small breed dogs, as well as his own involvement in clinical research, specifically with cavalier King Charles spaniels.

August 9, 2014: “Obesity in Pets”

Speaker: Dr. Richard Hill

In pets as with people, obesity can contribute to a number of diseases, including arthritis and diabetes but there are important differences among different species. Just as with their human counterparts, the cause of obesity in pets is typically straightforward – either overeating or lack of exercise. Being a couch potato doesn’t benefit you or your pet, but it’s not always easy to begin a more active lifestyle. Dr. Richard Hill, an internal medicine and nutrition specialist, will discuss what constitutes obesity in a pet, how to prevent and control it, and manageable steps you can take to help Fido and Fluffy stay lean and healthy.

August 2, 2014: “Parasite Prevention: Keeping your pet’s unfriendly friends at bay”

Speaker: Dr. Julia Wuerz

Parasites come in all shapes and sizes, and chances are your pet has had to deal with at least some form of parasite in its lifetime. Thankfully medications are routinely available and administered through a sound vaccination/wellness program provided through your pet’s veterinarian, but it’s always wise to remember the old adage that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Dr. Julia Wuerz will discuss common parasites that affect pets, best prevention practices and how your efforts can supplement your veterinarians in keeping them from becoming an expensive and potentially dangerous problem.

July 26, 2014: “Straight Talk: Importance of Good Communication in Veterinary  Medicine”

Speaker: Dr. Amy Stone

It is widely recognized in the veterinary profession that the successful care of animal patients starts with good communication with animal owners. Good veterinarians need to be able to articulate their findings in ways owners can understand. Dr. Amy Stone of UF’s Primary Care and Dentistry Service talks about some of the ways the profession as a whole has responded to growing evidence that communication plays a key role in successful patient care outcomes. She also will talk about what is being done at UF and elsewhere to teach veterinary students, the veterinarians of the future, the critical importance of communications skills, both in the veterinary hospital setting and among colleagues.

July 19, 2014: “Dealing with Itchy Pets”

Speaker: Dr. Rosanna Marsella

If your pet is constantly “itchy” or prone to ear infections, you may be dealing with an allergy of some kind. Persistent scratching and itching can be hard on your pet, but also on you, sorting out the cause of the problem can be frustrating and may take time. When is it time to call your veterinarian or visit a specialist? Dr. Rosanna Marsella, a veterinary dermatology specialist, will discuss some of the most common allergies seen in pets, including the single most common culprit – flea allergic dermatitis.

July, 12, 2014: “More on Pet Safety in Summer”

Speaker: Dr. Michael Schaer

Don’t let the dog days of summer hurt your four-legged friend. Dr. Michael Schaer, an emergency and critical care specialist, will discuss common problems seen by emergency veterinarians in the summer months. From heat stress to snakebite to thunderstorm phobias and water-related hazards, the potential for accidents and injury abound, even for responsible pet owners. Learn more about what to do and what not to do to keep summer relaxing and healthy for all members of your family, including your furry ones.

June 28, 2014: “Respiratory Disease in Horses”

Speaker: Dr. Chris Sanchez

Respiratory problems are common in horses, with some ailments more common than others depending on the horse’s age and lifestyle. These ailments can be viral, bacterial or may come about due to allergies or some other cause, can be fleeting or chronic, and can range from relatively inconsequential to life-threatening. Veterinarians seeking to make a diagnosis of an equine respiratory disease must first do a thorough physical examination of the horse’s upper and lower airways, sometimes supplemented by additional diagnostic tests. Dr. Chris Sanchez will discuss common respiratory problems in the horse, treatment options, symptoms horse owners should look for and when to call your veterinarian.

June 21, 2014: “Veterinary Anesthesia & Pain Management”

Speaker: Dr. Tiffany Granone

Many procedures in veterinary medicine require some form of sedation or pain management. How such medication is administered and monitored is critically important. The role of the veterinary anesthesiologist is to determine whether anesthesia or analgesia is appropriate in each case, which drugs to use and how they should be administered most safely to the animal patient. Dr. Tiffany Granone, a board-certified veterinary anesthesiologist, will discuss what’s involved in this process and how anesthesiologists contribute overall to the veterinary care team.

June 14, 2014: “Exotic Pets”

Speaker: Dr. Darryl Heard

Ever thought you might want to bring an exotic pet into your household? Pets other than the traditional dog or cat have become increasingly popular in the past few decades. However, before you bring home a pet rabbit, a snake, an iguana, a ferret or some other exotic species, there are some things you need to carefully consider. Dr. Darryl Heard, a zoological medicine specialist, will talk about some of the more common exotic pet species, their specific needs and the pros and cons of exotic pet ownership.

June 7, 2014: “Disaster Preparedness and Veterinary Medicine”

Speaker: John Haven

The UF College of Veterinary Medicine is a leader in disaster response efforts in the state of Florida and beyond. John Haven, director of the Veterinary Emergency Treatment Services (VETS) disaster response and technical rescue team, provides an update on the kinds of training involved in these efforts and why this training is critical for success in rescue situations involving both animals and people. He’ll discuss actual situations in which VETS and the Florida State Agricultural Response Team have deployed to provide disaster-related assistance, as well as UF’s contributions to national search and technical rescue standards.

May 31, 2014: “Rehabilitation Rx for Horses” (Archive: First aired on Feb. 18th 2012)

Speaker: Dr. Ali Morton

No horse owner wants to encounter performance limiting injuries with their animal, but what can be done when this happens?  If surgery or advanced therapies are needed, what happens next?  Are there additional options  to promote recovery? Horses that compete in high-level performance events are prone to certain types of injuries for which rehabilitative therapy can be very helpful. UF equine surgeon Ali Morton talks about some of the methods veterinarians recommend for getting horses back on their feet, how and why they work, and how even high-tech treatment such as stem cell therapy is being used at the UF Large Animal Hospital to help horses regain strength and soundness after surgery or trauma.

May 24, 2014: “Picking the Perfect Pet”

Speaker: Dr. Julie Levy

Pets are like family and picking a new pet may be the only time one gets to choose their relatives. We often choose our furry companions during the equivalent of speed-dating, spending a few minutes in front of each cage at a shelter or pet store or opening the door for a skinny stray that showed up on the porch. But pets can live 15 years or more, so a successful relationship has to be built on more than a brief infatuation. Dr. Julie Levy will discuss winning strategies for picking a new best friend and maintaining that relationship successfully over time.

May 17, 2014: “Managing Acute and Chronic Kidney Disease” (ARCHIVE: First aired Dec. 14, 2013)

Speaker: Dr. Carsten Bandt

When pets develop kidney failure, a treatment known as hemodialysis can  afford patients more time to recuperate from an acute injury. Hemodialysis and hemoperfusion are administered through a machine used to filter out toxins from the bloodstream.  Animal patients that receive this treatment typically are dogs and cats with acute kidney injury due to having consumed raisins, grapes, ethylene glycol and aspirin-type drugs, as well as injury associated with heat stroke and leptospirosis. Dr. Carsten Bandt, chief of the emergency medicine and critical care service, discusses how this treatment is being used successfully at UF and what it involves for the owner as well as for the ill pet.

May 10, 2014: “Cancer Treatment and Pets: Debunking the Myths”

Speaker: Dr. Sarah Boston

As common as cancer is among animal patients – by some estimates, roughly 50 percent of all dogs and 30 percent of all cats will be affected by cancer at some point in their lives – there’s bound to be a lot of talk about the disease. You might hear about what is, or isn’t causing cancer; where it’s likely to occur; what animals it’s likely to affect and whether treatment is or isn’t effective, but hearsay often doesn’t coincide with science. Dr. Sarah Boston, a surgical oncologist, will debunk some of the common myths relating to cancer in pets and why the disease does not lend itself to simple interpretations.

May 3, 2014: “Common Diagnostic Tests in Veterinary Clinical Pathology”

Speaker: Dr. Heather Wamsley

Laboratory testing of blood and other bodily fluids, tissues and cells is a routine, if behind-the-scenes, aspect of veterinary medicine. Just as in human medicine, veterinarians rely on specialized testing to diagnose disease and to help develop treatment plans for their patients. Dr. Heather Wamsley will discuss some of the common diagnostic tests that are performed in veterinary medicine, how testing has evolved in recent years, and the role of the clinical pathologist in disease diagnosis and prevention as well as by providing key support to your veterinarian.

April 26, 2014: “Emergency Transfusions in Dogs and Cats”

Speaker: Dr. Christine Iacovetta

Many pets that wind up in the veterinary emergency room would never survive if it weren’t for a blood transfusion. Donor blood used in these procedures is collected and transfused similarly in veterinary and human medicine. Dr. Christine Iacovetta, an emergency medicine specialist, discusses common situations in which transfusions are used, the importance of compatibility matching in blood types, procedural challenges and the importance of blood donor programs in saving animal lives.

April 19, 2014: “Controlling Parasites in Horses”

Speaker: Dr. Amanda House

The key to successful parasite control in horses is a strategic deworming program. What types of dewormers to give a horse, as well as when and how frequently these medications should be administered, are things each horse owner should discuss with their veterinarian. Dr. Amanda House, an equine extension and large animal medicine specialist, will address common questions horse owners have about deworming. She also will discuss the importance of initial testing in developing a baseline for a parasite control plan.

April 12, 2014: “Getting into Veterinary School”

Speaker: Dr. Julia Conway

Thinking of applying to veterinary school? The path to acceptance requires a lot of hard work and dedication, but the rewards of a career in veterinary medicine can be great. The study of veterinary medicine can lead not only to clinical practice, but also to work in public health, research, industry and the military. Dr. Julia Conway, director of veterinary medical admissions, will discuss some of the unique opportunities now available within the profession and what makes UF unique, as well as the application and admissions process.

April 5, 2014: “Open House 2014″

Speaker: Dr. Pam Ginn, with UF veterinary students

The UF College of Veterinary Medicine’s annual Open House, scheduled for April 12 this year, is a tradition in Gainesville for people of all ages. Dr. Pam Ginn, associate dean for students and instruction, joins some of the students involved in planning the event to talk about what goes into preparations, as well as what visitors can expect in 2014. You’ll hear what’s on tap with this year’s program, which will feature everything from ever-popular hospital tours to educational talks about how to get into veterinary school and entertaining demonstrations, such as agility dogs.

March 29, 2014: “Managing Diabetes in Pets”

Speaker: Dr. Alex Gallagher

Pets get diabetes, just as people do. Early signs of the disease typically include frequent urination, increased thirst, a large appetite and weight loss. Dr. Alex Gallagher will discuss risk factors for development of diabetes and how the disease is diagnosed. He also will discuss common treatment protocols in dogs and cats and why working with your veterinarian to manage this disease is so important.

March 22, 2014: “Equine Laminitis”

Speaker: Dr. Sarah Reuss

Laminitis, also known as founder, is a painful condition that affects horses’ feet. Caused by inflammation of the lamina, the Velcro-like tissue that connects the bone in the foot to the hoof wall, laminitis can lead to permanent lameness or even euthanasia. Dr. Sarah Reuss will discuss why and how horses develop this problem, how veterinarians diagnose and treat it and what horse owners can do to minimize the likelihood of the disease occurring.

March 15, 2014: “Shelter Medicine in Today’s World ”

Speaker: Dr. Brian DiGangi

When most people hear the term ‘animal shelter,’ they know what that means. But what exactly is shelter medicine, and what does it entail? In general, shelter medicine is the field of veterinary medicine that is dedicated to the care of homeless animals in shelters or other facilities, such as rescue organizations, that are focused on helping these animals find new homes. Dr. Brian DiGangi of UF’s Veterinary Community Outreach Program will discuss what these organizations do and how management of shelter populations has changed over the past decade.

March 8, 2014: “Neurological problems in pets”

Speaker: Dr. Tom Schubert

If your pet suffers from seizures, unexplained shaking episodes, suddenly begins carrying its head sideways or otherwise is behaving oddly, it very well may be experiencing some type of neurological problem. Dr. Tom Schubert, a veterinary neurology specialist, will discuss common neurological problems in pets – how to spot them, when to call your veterinarian and when a specialist might be needed, and some of the tools veterinarians at the University of Florida use for diagnosing and treating neurological disease.

March 1, 2014: “Nuclear Scintigraphy in Veterinary Medicine”

Speaker: Dr. Clifford Berry

Nuclear scintigraphy, or scanning, is a form of diagnostic imaging that allows veterinarians to detect areas of increased bone metabolism that may signal orthopedic diseases, such as lameness. Bone scans can help identify problems in areas of the body that would otherwise be inaccessible. Scintigraphy also can be used as treatment for certain diseases. Dr. Kip Berry, a radiology specialist, returns to the show to discuss the therapeutic and diagnostic applications of nuclear medicine in small and large animals.

Feb 22, 2014: “Equine Protozoal Myeloencephalitis”

Speaker: Dr. Maureen Long

Equine protozoal myeloencephalitis, better known to horse owners as EPM, is caused by a protozoal infection that affects horses’ central nervous system. Experts say that early identification is key to the successful treatment of this debilitating disease, most horses with mild symptoms recover fully if they are treated in time. Dr. Maureen Long, an infectious disease and equine medicine specialist, discusses what horse owners need to look for in their animals in order to recognize the signs of illness and seek veterinary care. She also will discuss the difficulties in diagnosis and progress made in treatment and what scientists know about the parasite, itself.

Feb 15, 2014: “Surprising Household Dangers to Your Pet”

Speaker: Dr. Bobbi Conner

Poisonous plants, dangerous foods and drinks, treacherous toys  — all of these household items can post life-threatening hazards to pets. Some potential dangers are more common knowledge than others, however. Dr. Bobbi Conner, an emergency care specialist, will discuss surprising potential dangers that can be found around the house, what you can do to keep these threats at bay, signs to look for if your pet t has encountered something toxic in the home environment and why immediate contact with your veterinarian is critical if this occurs.

Feb 8, 2014: “Diagnostic Imaging”

Speaker: Dr. Matt Winter

Diagnostic imaging in the veterinary profession has advanced remarkably, in ways few thought possible even a few short years ago. As technology advances, so, too, does veterinarians’ ability to pinpoint, monitor and even treat disease in animals of multiple species. Dr. Matt Winter returns to the show to discuss more about ways in which imaging technologies such as MRI, CT and ultrasound are providing greater insights into animal health, allowing more lives to be saved each day.

Feb 1, 2014: “Pet Food Recalls”

Speaker: Dr. Richard Hill

There have been many human and pet food recalls in recent years. Most food is safe to consume if sensible precautions are taken, but problems can occur at any step in food preparation, from the farm where ingredients are grown to when food is consumed. Dr. Richard Hill, a specialist in both small animal internal medicine and nutrition, will discuss how to minimize the risk to your pet, where to find current information regarding food recalls, signs to look for and when to contact your veterinarian.

Jan 25, 2014: “Organic Milk and Milk Products”

Speaker: Dr. Klibs Galvao

When you see organic milk in the supermarket, what exactly does that tell you about the product? Generally, the term refers to milk products from livestock raised through specific organic farming methods and authenticity is regulated by food authorities. But does this mean the product is healthier or safer? Dr. Klibs Galvao, a dairy extension specialist, returns to the show to discuss what’s behind the concept of organic milk; what you should know about organic and conventionally produced milk and milk products; what the true differences are between products and what you should know when it comes to making sound nutrition choices for your family.

Jan 18, 2014: “Similarities in Animals and Humans: Health and Ecosystem Impacts”

Speaker: Dr. Mike Walsh

Sleep patterns, obesity, exercise – many of the things we think of in terms of human health affect animals as well. Many diseases that affect animals also affect humans, and vice-versa. Some similarities may be more commonly known than others, but Dr. Mike Walsh, co-director of UF’s Aquatic Animal Health program, will discuss the many ways in which animals are “just like us” on this episode. Whether animals are wild, domesticated pets, are part of captive populations in aquariums or zoologic parks, how their health is managed makes a difference to all of us.

Jan 11, 2014: “Canine and Feline Heartworm Disease”

Speaker: Dr. Wendy Mandese

Heartworm disease in both dogs and cats is a serious and potentially fatal condition that damages the heart, lungs and related blood vessels. Although heartworm disease is almost 100 percent preventable, many dogs and cats are still diagnosed with it each year. Once the disease develops, it can be difficult and expensive to treat, so prevention is key. Dr. Wendy Mandese of UF’s Primary Care and Dentistry Service will discuss how you can keep your pet heart-healthy, and why consistent administration of heartworm preventive medication, along with regular visits to your veterinarian, is so important.

Jan 4, 2014: “Arthritis in Pets: Prevention, Recognition and Treatment”

Speaker: Dr. Stan Kim

Pets suffer from osteoarthritis, just as people do. In fact, veterinarians say arthritis is one of the most underdiagnosed conditions in their profession. Although the joint damage caused by arthritis can’t be reversed, the condition can be treated. As is the case with many diseases, however, early diagnosis is key. Dr. Stan Kim, an orthopedic surgery specialist, discusses how pet owners can in some cases prevent the disease from occurring in the first place,  how to recognize signs of arthritis in your pet, when it’s time to call your veterinarian and what can be done in veterinary medicine these days to treat the condition.

Dec 28, 2013: “Foal Care and Vaccinations” (ARCHIVE: First aired on 11/24/12)

Speaker: Dr. Amanda House

Newborn foals have special needs. On this show, Dr. Amanda House will offer some critical tips and a vaccination timeline for the newborn foal, focusing on disease prevention and how to recognize if you have a problem. Important vaccines for foals and when to administer them will also be discussed.

Dec 21, 2013: (Holiday programming)

Dec 14, 2013: “Managing Acute and Chronic Kidney Disease”

Speaker: Dr. Carsten Bandt

When pets develop kidney failure, a treatment known as hemodialysis can  afford patients more time to recuperate from an acute injury. Hemodialysis and hemoperfusion are administered through a machine used to filter out toxins from the bloodstream.  Animal patients that receive this treatment typically are dogs and cats with acute kidney injury due to having consumed raisins, grapes, ethylene glycol and aspirin-type drugs, as well as injury associated with heat stroke and leptospirosis. Dr. Carsten Bandt, chief of the emergency medicine and critical care service, discusses how this treatment is being used successfully at UF and what it involves for the owner as well as for the ill pet.

Dec 7, 2013: “Managing the Itchy Pet”

Speaker: Dr. Dunbar Gram

Skin problems, ear infections and allergies are among the most common reasons people bring their dogs and cats to a veterinarian. Caring for an itchy pet can be both emotionally and financially exhausting. Within two to three months, however, it is possible to control some of the common causes. Dr. Dunbar Gram, a veterinary dermatology specialist, talks about flea allergy and other types of allergies, including those that are food related or air-borne, how to tell the difference and when to call your veterinarian. He’ll also discuss current treatments, including allergy shots for airborne allergies and stringent flea control protocols for flea allergy.

Nov. 30, 2013: “Recognizing and Managing Colic in Horses” (ARCHIVE: First aired on 11/24/12)

Speaker: Dr. Chris Sanchez

Colic, defined as abdominal pain, is a major cause of illness and death in horses. Although many cases of gut pain are mild, others can be life threatening. Dr. Chris Sanchez, a large animal medicine specialist, will discuss what horse owners need to know about this disease, including how to recognize colic’s early signs, steps that can be taken to minimize the risk of it occurring, and when to contact a veterinarian.

Nov. 23, 2013: “Pet misbehaving? Common behavior problems and solutions”(ARCHIVE: First aired on 6/2/12)

Speaker: Dr. Terry Curtis

Experts estimate that more dogs and cats die annually as a result of behavior problems than all infectious diseases combined. Veterinary behavior has evolved as a specialty over the past 25 years, offering solutions to many if not most of the behavior problems pets can develop. Does your pet have separation anxiety, thunderstorm phobia, or show aggression toward people or other animals?  These are just some of the problems pets with behavior issues can exhibit. Dr. Terry Curtis, a board-certified veterinary behaviorist, shares her insights as to how she approaches these and other behavior issues, working closely with pet owners to bring harmony back into the household.

Nov. 16, 2013: “Cat-Friendly Veterinary Practices” (ARCHIVE: First Aired on 8/17/13

Speaker: Dr. Amy Stone

Cats have special needs, and the experience of visiting the veterinarian is not always a happy one for many a feline –or its owner. The Primary Care and Dentistry Service at the UF Small Animal Hospital is now a Cat Friendly Practice, and was one of the first veterinary teaching hospitals in the country to achieve that prestigious designation. Dr. Amy Stone talks about why taking your cat to the family veterinarian is important and shares some of the resources available to cat owners.

Nov. 9, 2013: “Advances in Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment” (ARCHIVE: First aired on 8/4/12)

Speaker: Dr. Kelvin  Kow

Cancer is unfortunately all too common in pets. One in four dogs die of the disease, according to the Morris Animal Foundation. Roughly half of all dogs over 10 years of age are believed to succumb to the disease, and cancer is also a leading cause of death in older cats.  Just as in humans, there are many types of cancer that can affect any part of the body, and any system. Dr. Kelvin Kow, an board-certified veterinary oncologist, will discuss common cancers seen in pets and some of the treatment options now available.

Nov. 2, 2013: “Veterinary Community Outreach at UF”

Speaker: Dr. Natalie Isaza

Students at the University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine have unique opportunities for community outreach. Dr. Natalie Isaza, director of the college’s Shelter Medicine Clerkship Program, discusses how UF veterinary students are making a difference – by working with area animal rescue groups to provide spay/neuter, and in some cases other procedures, to help animals become more adoptable, and by helping pets belonging to homeless and low income people through the St. Francis Pet Care Clinic.

Oct.26, 2013: “Common Problems in the Horse Eye”

Speaker: Dr. Brendan Mangan

Horses can develop some of the same eye problems that humans and other animals do, such as cataracts and glaucoma. Dr. Brendan Mangan, a veterinary opththalmology specialist, discusses common problems in the horse eye, including causes, methods of diagnosis and treatment options now available to horse owners. Learn more about why untreated eye problems can spell serious trouble for your horse, including infection or worse, and why horses should be regularly checked for the presence of eye disease.

Oct.19, 2013: “Online Classes in Aquatic Animal Health”

Speaker: Dr. Iske Larkin

UF’s Aquatic Animal Health program offers a variety of courses online. These courses address conservation, overall aquatic animal health and manatee health and conservation and provide an opportunity for a broad spectrum of learning opportunities to UF students and others who may not be enrolled in traditional curriculum programs. Dr. Iske Larkin, a lecturer and education coordinator for the Aquatic Animal Health program, will discuss the different course offerings and how they cover variety of marine animal topics.

Oct.12, 2013: “Cancer in people and in pets”

Speaker: Dr. Sarah Boston

Pets get many of the same types of cancer that people do. As the field of veterinary medicine has advanced in the past decade, veterinary oncologists are now able to treat many forms of cancer in ways similar or even identical to how the disease is treated in people. Dr. Sarah Boston, an oncology specialist, discusses ways in which cancer in animals resembles cancer in people, how these diseases are currently being treated at UF, how research into similarities of disease patterns in humans and animals has benefited both species, and what the future holds for treating cancer in pets.

Oct. 5, 2013: “Potential risks and benefits of feeding raw foods” (ARCHIVE: First aired on 7/21/12)

Speaker: Dr. Richard Hill

Many pet owners feed raw food because they believe raw food more closely mimics the natural diet of dogs and cats in the wild. But are raw food diets for pets really healthier than commercial diets? Dr. Richard Hill, a veterinary nutritionist and internal medicine specialist discusses the pros and cons of raw diets for pets, what the science says about the effects of such diets on pet health and why consulting with your veterinarian about the relative risks and benefits is so important.

Sept. 28, 2013: “Common Veterinary Emergencies”

Speaker: Dr. Michael Schaer

If your pet has experienced a trauma, such as being hit by a car; if it’s not breathing or you can’t feel a heartbeat; if the pet is unconscious and won’t wake up; is having a seizure or is bleeding from the eyes, nose or mouth, you have a definite emergency on your hands. Dr. Michael Schaer returns to the show to discuss these and other types of pet emergencies, and why it’s important to visit a veterinary emergency hospital near you as soon as possible in these cases.

Sept. 21, 2013: “What to Know When Adopting A Pet” (ARCHIVE: First aired on 6/23/12)

Speaker: Dr. Wendy. Mandese

Have you considered offering a forever home to a new pet? Most people have, but the success of that new relationship is largely a function of responsible pet ownership and awareness of what’s involved in making that commitment. There’s much to consider, from your own lifestyle and the type or breed of pet that would work best for your family’s needs, to adapting your environment to make room for the new furry family member. Dr. Wendy Mandese, a primary care veterinarian at UF, will address what you need to know and how to prepare before you buy or adopt a new pet.

Sept. 14, 2013: “The Role of the Veterinary Technician”

Speaker: Danielle Mauragis

Veterinary technicians, or nurses, are a critical part of patient care, whether that patient is a dog, a cat, an exotic pet, a horse or another  type of animal needing care in a hospital setting. Veterinary technicians work closely with you and your veterinarian , sometimes very visibly and often behind the scenes. Danielle Mauragis, a certified veterinary technician, returns to the show to discuss the role of the veterinary technician and changing aspects of the profession.

Sept. 7, 2013: “Cruciate Rupture and Repair in Dogs”

Speaker: Dr. Antonio Pozzi

If your dog starts limping on a back leg, it may be experiencing one of the more common conditions seen and treated by veterinary orthopedic surgeons – a full or partially ruptured cranial cruciate ligament, (the equivalent of the “ACL” in humans.) Dr. Antonio Pozzi, an orthopedic surgery specialist, discusses causes of this injury, which occurs in the knee joint, or stifle, as well as how the disease is typically diagnosed, treatment options and what you should know if your dog needs to undergo surgery.

Aug. 31, 2013: “Small Animal Ultrasound” (ARCHIVE: First aired on 2/9/13)

Speaker: Dr. Clifford “Kip” Berry

Diagnostic ultrasound imaging is one of many tools available to veterinarians these days for determining the cause of disease in pets. Ultrasonography makes use of sound waves to provide information about the body’s internal organs and has a variety of applications in veterinary medicine. Ultrasound is also economical and painless to pets, and most patients require little or no sedation.  Dr. Kip Berry, a radiology specialist, talks about the benefits of ultrasound in small animals, how it’s being used at UF and why it use can be life-saving.

Aug. 24, 2013: “Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia”

Speaker: Dr. Andre Shih

Pain management and control is a responsibility every veterinarian takes very seriously. Whether a pet is receiving  X-rays or some other form of diagnostic imaging, getting surgery or suffering from some form of trauma, it most likely will receive some type of drug for pain management or stabilization. Veterinarians must determine whether anesthesia or analgesia is appropriate, and how to deliver the appropriate drugs most safely to the animal patient.Dr. Andre Shih, a board-certified veterinary anesthesiologist, shares some of the ways in which this important medical discipline has evolved, and what you can expect if your pet has to undergo sedation or anesthesia for a veterinary procedure.

Aug. 17, 2013: “Cat-Friendly Veterinary Practices”

Speaker: Dr. Amy Stone

Cats have special needs, and the experience of visiting the veterinarian is not always a happy one for many a feline –or its owner. The Primary Care and Dentistry Service at the UF Small Animal Hospital is now a Cat Friendly Practice, and was one of the first veterinary teaching hospitals in the country to achieve that prestigious designation. Dr. Amy Stone talks about why taking your cat to the family veterinarian is important and shares some of the resources available to cat owners.

Aug. 10, 2013: “Rabbits as Pets”

Speaker: Dr. Darryl Heard

Rabbits can make great pets, but having the right expectations can make all the difference. Dr. Darryl Heard shares what you need to know if you’re considering getting a rabbit as a pet and what’s involved in properly caring for rabbits, from the environment they live in, to the importance of good nutrition and good husbandry to provide a long life and prevent health problems from developing.

Aug. 3, 2013: “Veterinary Summer Academy”

Speaker: Jonathan Orsini

The UF College of Veterinary Medicine just recently concluded its second annual Veterinary Summer Academy, giving rising high school sophomores an opportunity to learn more about the diverse careers and opportunities available in veterinary medicine. College admissions director Jonathan Orsini talks about why the summer camp is held, what the program consists of and how it works to enhance awareness of the veterinary profession among young people.

July 27, 2013: “Special needs of aging pets” (ARCHIVE: First aired on 12/10/11)

Speaker: Dr. Wendy Mandese

One of the more difficult things about having a companion animal is that you must watch him or her age. As they age, dogs and cats experience many of the same physical and mental changes that humans do. They find it a little more difficult to get around, their vision deteriorates, and they get a little hard of hearing. Dr. Wendy Mandese, a primary care veterinarian, talks about what to expect when your pet ages and what you can do to ensure that Fido and Fluffy enjoy the best possible quality of life in their senior years, and why regular visits to your veterinarian are key.

July 20, 2013: “Kidney and Urinary Tract Disease in Pets”

Speaker: Dr. Andrew Specht

Pets can suffer from acute or chronic kidney disease and failure, just as humans do. Dogs and cats can also get a variety of different urinary tract problems such as infections, stones, incontinence, and others. Dr. Andrew Specht will discuss common clinical signs to watch for in your pet that might indicate either kidney or urinary tract problems, as well as how these diseases are commonly diagnosed and treated.

July 13, 2013: “Common Problems in Veterinary Neurology”

Speaker: Dr. Tom Schubert

Veterinary neurology specialists deal with problems such as paralysis and seizures in pets, which can be caused by various diseases. However, even backyard hazards such as ticks and coral snakes can cause paralysis. Dr. Tom Schubert discusses common problems seen by veterinary neurologists and how these problems are typically diagnosed and treated at the UF Veterinary Hospitals.

July 6, 2013: “When Your Cat Needs Surgery”

Speaker: Dr. Gary Ellison

If your cat needs surgery, it can be an emotional time. You may have questions and uncertainties about what this means for your animal – and for you. Dr. Gary Ellison will discuss the three main types of surgery – elective, non-elective and emergency – and what you should know about each, as well as some of the more common procedures cats receive at UF. He’ll share what you can expect before, during and after your cat’s surgical procedure and what veterinarians do to ensure procedures are as safe as possible for your pet.

June 29, 2013: “First  Aid for Pets”

Speaker: Dr. Christine Iocovetta

When your pet is experiencing an emergency health issue, chances are you’ve contacted an emergency veterinary service for advice, or soon will. Learn about care you yourself can provide as well as what to avoid doing prior to arriving at the veterinary office. Dr. Christine Iacovetta of UF’s Emergency and Critical Care Service will share valuable information about how to effectively serve as a first responder in situations like this.

June 22, 2013: “Flea Control for Dogs and Cats”

Speaker: Dr. Rosanna Marsella

The warm summer months unfortunately mean it’s open season for fleas, and it is extremely important to make sure your pet and hour home are free of these pesky parasites. Dr. Rosanna Marsella, a dermatology specialist, will discuss new flea treatments, the difference between flea control for the general pet population and allergic patients, and how safe treatment differs between dogs and cats.

June 15, 2013: “It’s June and my mare is not pregnant. Now what?”

Speaker: Dr. Margo Macpherson

Most horse breeding farms consider a 65 percent conception rate about average, but that means 35 percent of all the mares bred will not have another opportunity to become pregnant until the next breeding season…a year later. If your mare is in this category, you may well wonder why this is happening and what if anything can be done to enhance your mare’s likelihood of getting pregnant. Dr. Margo Macpherson, an equine reproduction expert, will discuss ways to enhance the possibilities of pregnancy success with your mare through factors such as breeding practices and proper nutrition.

June 8, 2013: “Health Care for Goats”

Speaker: Dr. Sarah Reuss

Goats are used to clear brush, provide meat and milk and produce fiber for clothing in many developing countries. They also very playful and affectionate, and can often be great pets. While goats can be used to clear brush from your yard, the popular idea that goats can eat anything, including tin cans, is false. Goats are treated at UF’s Large Animal Hospital Hospital every week for diseases such as parasites, urinary tract blockages and problems relating to pregnancy. Dr. Sarah Reuss, a large animal medicine specialist, will discuss these common ailments and important things to know about goat health.

June 1, 2013: “Updates on the Role of Radiology in Pet Health”

Speaker: Dr. Matt Winter

Diagnostic imaging is the marriage of medicine and technology.  The discovery of X-rays in 1895 revolutionized medicine, and since that time, technological advancements have continued to help us provide deeper insights into the human body through diagnostic imaging.  Dr. Matt Winter will discuss how imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography as well as ultrasound have changed the way veterinarians diagnose and monitor disease in veterinary patients.

May 25, 2013: “Pet ER: What is a Medical Emergency?” (ARCHIVE: First aired on )

Speaker: Dr. Bobbi Conner

How do you know when your pet is experiencing a medical emergency? Obvious trauma cases would include animals being hit by a car, bleeding profusely from an injury or accident, or being bitten by a poisonous snake. Other situations may be life-threatening but not as obvious. If your animal is consistently not eating, vomiting or showing signs of gastrointestinal distress, you may have an emergency on your hands. Dr. Bobbi Conner talks about what constitutes a pet medical emergency and shares some of the common situations seen at the UF Small Animal Hospital   and how to avoid these problems with your pet.

May 18, 2013: “One Health”

Speaker: Dr. Rowan Milner

The term One Health refers to the integrative effort of multiple disciplines working locally, nationally and globally to attain optimal health for people, animals and the environment. Dr. Rowan Milner, a veterinary oncologist and college administrator, will discuss how collaborations with scientists, physicians and professionals from other disciplines are furthering progress in research and patient care for both animals and people at the University of Florida.

May 11, 2013: “Rescue Groups: What you should know before you adopt a pet”

Speaker: Dr. Brian DiGangi

Anyone considering adopting a pet has many options for where to find that animal, whether it be the local animal shelter, the Humane Society, or breed-specific rescue groups. Dr. Brian DiGangi of UF’s Merial Shelter Medicine Clerkship Program will discuss what these groups have in common and how they differ, as well as the benefits of adopting a pet and how to determine what breed or breeds might be best for your family.

May 4, 2013: “Disaster Preparedness”

Speaker: Mr. John Haven

When a disaster strikes, animals as well as humans are vulnerable. In some cases, specialized training is needed for animals to be rescued, whether it be from a sinkhole, a flooded area, or any place where access is impeded. The UF Veterinary Emergency Treatment Service, (VETS) has responded to several natural disasters in Florida, including hurricanes and fires, as well as disease outbreaks affecting animal populations. John Haven, VETS director, will share how this group has evolved to serve the state as an important resource.

April 27, 2013: “Proper Care for Pet Fish”

Speaker: Dr. Denise Petty

Ornamental fish can brighten our lives, but like all animals they need proper care to thrive. Whether you’re learning the basics of fish care, an old pro or just considering whether to jump in and buy your first aquarium, you’ll likely learn something new when fish veterinarian Dr. Denise Petty returns to the show to discuss how to keep your pet fish healthy. She’ll also address common myths about fish care and will talk about why water quality is so critical to fish health.

April 20, 2013: “What does Behavior have to do with Shelter Medicine?”

Speaker: Dr. Julie Levy and Dr. Clive Wynne

As it turns out, the answer is “lots!” Dr. Julie Levy, founder of Operation Catnip and Maddie’s Professor of Shelter Medicine, teams with UF’s Dr. Clive Wynn, a psychologist whose research focus is on animal behavior, to talk about behavioral issues seen commonly in shelter environments and how veterinarians are working with shelters to minimize these problems and enhance the adoptability of these animals.

April 13, 2013: “How to Get into Veterinary School” (ARCHIVE: First aired on 7/28/12) ”

Speaker: Jonathan Orsini

Veterinary professionals provide animal health care, but also do many other kinds of jobs. They help ensure the safety of the nation’s food supply, work to control the spread of diseases, and conduct research that helps both animals and humans. A veterinary career can be fulfilling and exciting but the process of becoming a veterinarian requires a substantial investment of time, resources and personal commitment. Jonathan Orsini, director of admissions at the UF College of Veterinary Medicine, will discuss what’s involved in getting into veterinary school and what potential applicants should keep in mind before they apply.

April 6, 2013: “College of Veterinary Medicine Open House ”

Speaker: Dr. Pamela Ginn and veterinary students Mark Belyeu and Christina Suhr

The UF College of Veterinary Medicine’s annual Open House is a tradition in Gainesville. Learn what’s on tap for the upcoming Open House, scheduled for April 13, when Dr. Pam Ginn teams with two veterinary students to discuss the various activities planned, what goes into organizing the event and what attendees can expect to see and do that day.

Mar. 30, 2013: “Equine Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases”

Speaker: Dr. Martha Mallicote

The endocrine system is made up of several organs that produce hormones that control many functions of the body. In horses, endocrine disorders are quite common, and are diagnosed and treated frequently by veterinarians. In this episode, Dr. Martha Mallicote describes some of the more common diseases known to affect horses, including anhidrosis, equine Cushing’s disease and equine metabolic syndrome, and what horse owners should know to watch out for.

Mar. 23, 2013: “Keeping Pets Safe in Summer Months ”

Speaker: Dr. Michael Schaer

With warmer weather comes increased outdoor activity, both for people and for pets. Dr. Michael Schaer, an emergency and critical care specialist, talks about some of the common problems pets experience in spring and summer months and  how to keep these problems at bay. Managing thunderstorm  phobias and  preventing water-related hazards are among the topics to be discussed.

Mar. 16, 2013: “Therapeutic Diets”

Speaker: Dr. Richard Hill

It’s no secret that good health is associated with good nutrition, in pets just as in people. Today, many therapeutic diets are available to help manage specific medical conditions. Dr. Richard Hill, a board-certified veterinary internist and nutritionist, explains how therapeutic diets from the veterinarian differ from those you can buy in the store and how special diets may improve your pet’s health.

Mar. 9, 2013: “Managing Heart Disease in Pets”

Speaker: Dr. Herb Maisenbacher

Heart failure, heart murmur, valvular disease: You’ve probably heard these terms in relation to human health, but did you know pets get many of the same diseases?  It is just as important to diagnose and treat heart disease in pets as it is in people, and similarly, early detection can mean the difference between life and death. Dr.  Herb Maisenbacher, a clinical assistant professor of cardiology, will discuss common heart ailments affecting dogs and cats and what veterinarians can do these days to better diagnose and treat these problems.

Mar. 2, 2013: “The Importance of Preventive Veterinary Care”

Speaker: Dr. Wendy Mandese

The importance of preventive health care cannot be stressed enough in veterinary medicine. Heartworm/flea prevention, weight management, home dental care and keeping pets up to date on their vaccinations are all part of an effective disease prevention strategy. Dr. Wendy Mandese will discuss why regular visits to your veterinarian are important for keeping your pet healthy as well as saving you time and money over time.

Feb. 23, 2013: “What You Should Know About Veterinary Neurological Disorders in your Pet” (ARCHIVE: First aired on 9/8/12)

Speaker: Dr. Tom Schubert

Diseases of the brain, spinal cord, nerves and muscles – all part of the nervous system – affect your pet in ways similar to humans in many cases, such as through paralysis and seizures. Dr. Tom Schubert, a board-certified veterinary neurologist, will talk about how veterinary specialists at UF deal with these diseases and will also talk about potential backyard hazards that may cause paralysis, such as ticks and coral snakes.

Feb. 16, 2013: “Evaluating Lumps and Bumps in your Pet”

Speaker: Dr. Heather Wamsley

Any abnormal lump or bump on your pet should be check by a veterinarian immediately. Although some lumps, called lipomas, are due to fat deposits and generally harmless, others could be signs of serious disease, such as cancer. Dr. Heather Wamsley, a board-certified veterinary clinical pathologist, returns to the show to discuss more about the ways in which veterinarians diagnose lumps and bumps in pets and and the role of the clinical pathologist. Clinical pathologists are able to discern many things in the laboratory, using not just what they see with the naked eye but what they are able to test for.Learn more about what goes on behind the scenes when it comes to diagnosing certain diseases in pets in this episodes.

Feb. 9, 2013: “Small Animal Ultrasound”

Speaker: Dr. Clifford “Kip” Berry

Diagnostic ultrasound imaging is one of many tools available to veterinarians these days for determining the cause of disease in pets. Ultrasonography makes use of sound waves to provide information about the body’s internal organs and has a variety of applications in veterinary medicine. Ultrasound is also economical and painless to pets, and most patients require little or no sedation.  Dr. Kip Berry, a radiology specialist, talks about the benefits of ultrasound in small animals, how it’s being used at UF and why it use can be life-saving.

Feb. 2, 2013: “Effects of Disease on Marine Life: Why You Should Care”

Speaker: Dr. Don Behringer

The effects of disease on marine animals can be wide-ranging. Lobsters, crabs, sponges and corals often share habitat but when disease strikes, the effects can ripple through the ecosystem in remarkable ways. Dr. Don Behringer, an expert in marine disease ecology, will discuss some of the impacts of disease on the ecology of these animals, and why understanding the relationships between marine species is critical.

Jan. 26, 2013: “Taking Shelter Medicine to the Next Level”

Speaker: Dr. Terry Spencer

Caring for animals in a shelter environment requires a unique set of skills beyond what veterinary students learn routinely while in school. Managing disease in a large population of animals;  examining animal victims of cruelty that are medical evidence; and preventing or modifying behavior problems common in shelter environments are just a few capabilities veterinarians working in shelters must possess.  Maddie’s Shelter Medicine Program at UF recently began an online graduate certificate program to provide veterinarians and students all over the world with a tool for enhancing their knowledge and skills. Dr. Terry Spencer will discuss why the expertise of veterinarians working with shelter animals ultimately benefits the animals and enhances opportunities for live release from shelters.

Jan. 19, 2013: “Fighting Melanoma in Dogs and Horses”

Speaker: Dr. Rowan Milner

University of Florida veterinarians have actively been involved for years in efforts to stop the spread of melanoma, a common cancer, in dogs and horses. Through the development of a vaccine, progress has been made. Learn more about what melanoma is, how it commonly appears in dogs and horses and how this form of cancer is different in animals  than in people when Dr. Rowan Milner, a veterinary oncologist, takes on this subject.

Jan. 12, 2013: “Foal Care and Vaccinations”

Speaker: Dr. Amanda House

Newborn foals have special needs. On this show, Dr. Amanda House will offer some critical tips and a vaccination timeline for the newborn foal, focusing on disease prevention and how to recognize if you have a problem. Important vaccines for foals and when to administer them will also be discussed.

Jan. 5, 2013: “Pet ER: What is a Medical Emergency?”

Speaker: Dr. Bobbi Conner

How do you know when your pet is experiencing a medical emergency? Obvious trauma cases would include animals being hit by a car, bleeding profusely from an injury or accident, or being bitten by a poisonous snake. Other situations may be life-threatening but not as obvious. If your animal is consistently not eating, vomiting or showing signs of gastrointestinal distress, you may have an emergency on your hands. Dr. Bobbi Conner talks about what constitutes a pet medical emergency and shares some of the common situations seen at the UF Small Animal Hospital   and how to avoid these problems with your pet.

Dec. 29, 2012: “Demystifying cancer in pets”

Speaker: Dr. Nick Bacon

Receiving a diagnosis that your pet has cancer can be frightening at many levels. How common is cancer in pets? What types of cancers are common in pets and what sorts of treatments exist for the various manifestations of this disease? Can an any types of cancer in animals be cured? Dr. Nick Bacon, an oncology surgeon, will share his considerable knowledge in this area with the goal of demystifying this subject and providing information that should prove valuable to any pet owner who is presently going through, or has ever been through, this experience with their animal.

Dec. 22, 2012: “Special programming due to holidays”

Dec. 15, 2012: “Animal CSI”

Speaker: Drs. Jason Byrd and Rachel Touroo and Amanda Fitch

When animals are abused, often determining the cause of death or injury requires specific forensic analysis, which in turn becomes evidence that can be used in court. The University of Florida plays a key role in providing veterinarians with knowledge about forensic investigations and evidence collection, and also provides information to other groups and individuals through various educational programs, including online learning as well as on-campus courses.  Dr. Jason Byrd, associate director William R. Maples Center for Forensic Medicine, and colleagues will discuss how this program works and some of the interesting ways it collaborates with other groups in field investigations and disaster response.

Dec. 8, 2012: “Small Animal Mythbusters-Setting the Record Straight”

Speaker: Dr. Alex Gallagher

Dogs are color blind. Cats always land on their feet. The dog’s nose is warm, therefore it must be sick. True or false? Actually, these are just a few of many myths passed along in our culture which can affect not only how animals are perceived, but also human behavior and judgment when it comes to caring for pets. Dr. Alex Gallagher sets the record straight on several common myths relating to animals, specifically those that relate to pet health.

Dec. 1 2012: “How and Why to Identify Your Pet”

Speaker: Dr. Brian DiGangi

If your pet is lost or displaced, the ability to identify it could very well save its life. Whether through tags, collars or implanted microchips, it’s important that pet owners understand the importance of pet identification. Lost pets frequently wind up at animal shelters, where without the ability to identify a pet’s owner, euthanasia is real and sad possibility. Dr. Brian DiGangi of UF’s Shelter Medicine program discusses why pet identification is so important for the recovery of lost pets.

Nov. 24, 2012: “Recognizing and Managing Colic in Horses”

Speaker: Dr. Chris Sanchez

Colic, defined as abdominal pain, is a major cause of illness and death in horses. Although many cases of gut pain are mild, others can be life threatening. Dr. Chris Sanchez, a large animal medicine specialist, will discuss what horse owners need to know about this disease, including how to recognize colic’s early signs, steps that can be taken to minimize the risk of it occurring, and when to contact a veterinarian.

Nov. 17, 2012: “Common Behavior Problems”

Speaker: Dr. Terry Curtis

Experts estimate that more dogs and cats die annually as a result of behavior problems than all infectious diseases combined. Veterinary behavior has evolved as a specialty over the past 25 years, offering solutions to many if not most of the behavior problems pets can develop. Does your pet have separation anxiety, thunderstorm phobia, or show aggression toward people or other animals?  These are just some of the problems pets with behavior issues can exhibit. Dr. Terry Curtis, a board-certified veterinary behaviorist, shares her insights as to how she approaches these and other behavior issues, working closely with pet owners to bring harmony back into the household.

Nov. 10, 2012: “Special Needs of Aging Pets”

Speaker: Dr. Wendy Mandese

One of the more difficult things about having a companion animal is that you must watch him or her age. As they age, dogs and cats experience many of the same physical and mental changes that humans do. They find it a little more difficult to get around, their vision deteriorates, and they get a little hard of hearing. Dr. Wendy Mandese, a primary care veterinarian, talks about what to expect when your pet ages and what you can do to ensure that Fido and Fluffy enjoy the best possible quality of life in their senior years, and why regular visits to your veterinarian are key.

Nov. 3, 2012:   “Vaccination Protocols”

Speaker: Dr. Amy Stone

There’s no doubt that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, as the saying goes. For pets, prevention of many major diseases is possible through a responsible vaccination schedule. Dr. Amy Stone, a primary care veterinarian, talks about why this is so, and shares information about recommended vaccination protocols. The good news is, many diseases really can be prevented by keeping your pet current on its shots and through effective communication with, and regular visits to, your veterinarian.

Oct. 27, 2012:  “General surgery in the dog and cat”

Speaker: Dr. Gary Ellison

If your pet has swallowed a foreign body or suffers from some types of soft tissue disease affecting its internal organs, your veterinarian might need to perform general surgery to treat the condition. Veterinarians today have the ability to make use of advanced diagnostic tools such as MRI and CT to shed light on many medical conditions, and to enhance the accuracy of all forms of treatment, including surgery. Dr. Gary Ellison will discuss how general surgery is being used today to treat dogs and cats and what you should know if you are contemplating a surgical procedure for your pet.

Oct. 20, 2012:  “The role of veterinary technicians in Animal Health” (ARCHIVE: First aired on 6/9/12)”

Speaker: Danielle Mauragis, CVT

When you visit your veterinarian, in most cases you will have one-on-one contact with at least one key member of an important group that works behind-the-scenes to keep your pet healthy and happy. That group consists of veterinary technicians, or nurses, that perform everything from taking your pet’s weight, to making bandage changes to keeping your pet’s hospital accommodations clean and monitoring various aspects of care. Certified veterinary technician Danielle Mauragis talks about the role of the veterinary technician and changing aspects of the profession.

Oct. 13, 2012:  “Lameness and Limping in Dogs”

Speaker: Dr. Stan Kim

Just like people, dogs can experience broken bones, sprained muscles and torn ligaments, all of which can lead to the sudden onset of limping or trouble with movement. Arthritis is another condition in which these problems commonly occur. Dr. Stan Kim, an orthopedic surgery, will discuss common causes of lameness and limping in dogs and ways in which veterinarians diagnose and treat these problems.

Oct. 6, 2012:  “Nutrition’s Role in Protecting Your Pet Against Disease” (ARCHIVE: First aired on 3/17/12)

Speaker: Dr. Rowan Milner

Proper nutritional management is essential for your pet to remain healthy and active. Nutrition plays an important role in influencing your pet’s susceptibility to a variety of disease, including cancer. Dr. Rowan Milner, a veterinary oncologist, will share information about why this is the case, the role and efficacy of nutritional supplements, and what pet owners should know about the relationship between diet and disease.

Sept 29, 2012:  “Early signs of illness in the dog and cat”

Speaker: Dr. Michael Schaer

Our pets can’t talk, but when they’re sick, they will often tell us in other ways that they are hurting or in need of help. Sometimes these expressions of illness may be obvious, such as in bouts of vomiting or gastrointestinal upset, but other times behavior such as lethargy could be an early warning sign that something is very wrong. Dr. Michael Schaer, a professor emeritus of medicine and emergency and critical care, will talk about what to look out for and when it’s time to take your pet to the veterinarians.

Sept 22, 2012:  “Rehabilitation Rx for Horses” (ARCHIVE: First aired on 2/18/12)

Speaker: Dr. Ali Morton

No horse owner wants to encounter performance limiting injuries with their animal, but what can be done when this happens?  If surgery or advanced therapies are needed, what happens next?  Are there additional options  to promote recovery? Horses that compete in high-level performance events are prone to certain types of injuries for which rehabilitative therapy can be very helpful. UF equine surgeon Ali Morton talks about some of the methods veterinarians recommend for getting horses back on their feet, how and why they work, and how even high-tech treatment such as stem cell therapy is being used at the UF Large Animal Hospital to help horses regain strength and soundness after surgery or trauma.

Sept 15, 2012:  “Dairy Cows: Welfare and management”

Speaker: Dr. Klibs Galvao

Have you ever wondered about the role veterinarians play in keeping dairy products safe? It’s a key role, and one that involves not only animal health but also an understanding of herd management and biosafety practices. Dr. Klibs Galvao, a food animal veterinarian with the UF College of Veterinary Medicine, will discuss issues that affect dairy cows in Florida and elsewhere, and how UF assists area farms in better managing their practices and keeping these cows healthy.

Sept 8, 2012:  “What You Should Know About Veterinary Neurological Disorders in your Pet”

Speaker: Dr. Tom Schubert

Diseases of the brain, spinal cord, nerves and muscles – all part of the nervous system – affect your pet in ways similar to humans in many cases, such as through paralysis and seizures. Dr. Tom Schubert, a board-certified veterinary neurologist, will talk about how veterinary specialists at UF deal with these diseases and will also talk about potential backyard hazards that may cause paralysis, such as ticks and coral snakes.

Aug 25, 2012:  “Cataract surgery in dogs ”

Speaker: Dr. Brendan Mangan

Just like people, dogs can develop eye problems for a variety of reasons, including disease and old age. A cataract in a dog’s eye is a cloudy lens, which impedes vision. In a dog with a cataract, the affected eye may appear hazy, or the pupil might be white. Cataracts cannot be cured with medication, but surgery can be performed, often very effectively, in cases where there is no other disease present in the eye. Dr. Brendan Mangan, a board-certified veterinary ophthalmologist, will discuss when cataract surgery is an option and what to do if you suspect your dog has this problem.

Aug 18, 2012:  “Evaluating Lumps and Bumps in your Pet ”

Speaker: Dr. Heather Wamsley

If you detect a lump or a bump on your pet, it’s important to have it checked out by a veterinarian immediately. Some of these lumps, called lipomas, are due to fat deposits and are generally harmless. Others, however, can be signs of serious disease, such as cancer. Your veterinarian can often make a quick diagnosis, sometimes working with clinical pathology specialist in a laboratory. Learn more about what various findings can mean in terms of treatment for your animal when Dr. Heather Wamsley, a board-certified veterinary clinical pathologist, share her insights.

Aug 11, 2012:  “Online learning opportunities in UF’s Aquatic Animal Health program”

Speaker: Dr. Iske Larkin

The Aquatic Animal Health program at UF has many different aspects, through which expertise is channeled to provide better health care to a variety of aquatic animals in the field and in captivity. An exciting recent development in this program has been the creation of online courses on such topics as aquatic animal conservation, fish histology, aquaculture, and manatee health. Dr. Iske Larkin, a research assistant professor and education coordinator for the program, will provide updates on current offerings and future directions this program is expected to take.

Aug 4, 2012:  “Cancer in Pets: Advances in Diagnosis and Treatment”

Speaker: Dr. Kelvin Kow

Cancer is unfortunately all too common in pets. One in four dogs die of the disease, according to the Morris Animal Foundation. Roughly half of all dogs over 10 years of age are believed to succumb to the disease, and cancer is also a leading cause of death in older cats.  Just as in humans, there are many types of cancer that can affect any part of the body, and any system. Dr. Kelvin Kow, an board-certified veterinary oncologist, will discuss common cancers seen in pets and some of the treatment options now available.

July 28, 2012:  “How to Get into Veterinary School.”

Speaker: Jonathan Orsini

Veterinary professionals provide animal health care, but also do many other kinds of jobs. They help ensure the safety of the nation’s food supply, work to control the spread of diseases, and conduct research that helps both animals and humans. A veterinary career can be fulfilling and exciting but the process of becoming a veterinarian requires a substantial investment of time, resources and personal commitment. Jonathan Orsini, director of admissions at the UF College of Veterinary Medicine, will discuss what’s involved in getting into veterinary school and what potential applicants should keep in mind before they apply.

July 21, 2012: “Potential risks and benefits of feeding raw foods”

Speaker: Dr. Richard Hill

Many pet owners feed raw food because they believe raw food more closely mimics the natural diet of dogs and cats in the wild. But are raw food diets for pets really healthier than commercial diets? Dr. Richard Hill, a veterinary nutritionist and internal medicine specialist discusses the pros and cons of raw diets for pets, what the science says about the effects of such diets on pet health and why consulting with your veterinarian about the relative risks and benefits is so important.

July 14, 2012: “Thyroid Diseases of the Dog and Cat”

Speaker: Dr. Alex Gallagher

Fido acting unusually lethargic and gaining weight lately? Or is Fluffy hyperactive and losing weight? Thyroid disease, specifically canine hypothyroidism and feline hyperthyroidism, may be the culprit. Because these diseases can resemble other health problems, a list of your pet’s signs, a thorough examination and blood tests will help your veterinarian diagnose the condition. Dr. Alex Gallagher, an internal medicine specialist, will discuss the different types of thyroid disease that can affect dogs and cats and the types of treatment available.

July 7, 2012: Note: Due to the holiday, we will not have a live broadcast and instead will air a repeat of  “Operation Catnip.”

Speaker: Dr.  Julie Levy

Every community has feral cats, and controlling these feline populations can be a huge challenge. Operation Catnip, a nonprofit organization that offers free spay/neuter and vaccines for unowned, free-roaming community cats from the Alachua County area, has been in existence at UF since1998. Dr. Julie Levy, who founded the all-volunteer program, talks about how the program works, what its goals are and how you can become involved.

June 30, 2012:“Treatment of Skin Allergies in Pets”

Speaker: Dr. Ursula Oberkirchner

Many dogs and cats develop skin allergies of one sort or another. The options for treatment depend on pinpointing the cause of the allergy, which can be a tricky process, and then working to eliminate the cause.  Dr. Ursula Oberkirchner, a veterinary dermatologist, will talk more about the types of allergies pets get and will discuss some of common treatment options available, including vaccines, steroids and cyclosporine.

June 23, 2012:“What to Know When Adopting a Pet”

Speaker: Dr. Wendy Mandese

Have you considered offering a forever home to a new pet? Most people have, but the success of that new relationship is largely a function of responsible pet ownership and awareness of what’s involved in making that commitment. There’s much to consider, from your own lifestyle and the type or breed of pet that would work best for your family’s needs, to adapting your environment to make room for the new furry family member. Dr. Wendy Mandese, a primary care veterinarian at UF, will address what you need to know and how to prepare before you buy or adopt a new pet.

June 16, 2012:“All About Image: The Importance of Diagnostic Imaging to Animal Health”

Speaker: Dr. Matt Winter

As a follow up to an earlier show, Dr. Matt Winter of the UF Veterinary Hospitals’ radiology group will share more information about the latest diagnostic tools being used at UF to pinpoint diseases and guide the treatment process. Learn more about how radiology works and why the cornerstone of any good treatment plan is an accurate diagnosis, and how some of the specialized forms of  diagnostic imaging, such as MRI and CT, are being used these days to treat a variety of health conditions in small and large animals.

June 9, 2012:“The role of Veterinary Technicians in Animal Health”

Speaker: Danielle Mauragis, CVT

When you visit your veterinarian, in most cases you will have one-on-one contact with at least one key member of an important group that works behind-the-scenes to keep your pet healthy and happy. That group consists of veterinary technicians, or nurses, that perform everything from taking your pet’s weight, to making bandage changes to keeping your pet’s hospital accommodations clean and monitoring various aspects of care. Certified veterinary technician Danielle Mauragis talks about the role of the veterinary technician and changing aspects of the profession.

June 2, 2012:“Pet misbehaving? Common behavior problems and solutions”

Speaker: Dr. Terry Curtis

Experts estimate that more dogs and cats die annually as a result of behavior problems than all infectious diseases combined. Veterinary behavior has evolved as a specialty over the past 25 years, offering solutions to many if not most of the behavior problems pets can develop. Does your pet have separation anxiety, thunderstorm phobia, or show aggression toward people or other animals?  These are just some of the problems pets with behavior issues can exhibit. Dr. Terry Curtis, a board-certified veterinary behaviorist, shares her insights as to how she approaches these and other behavior issues, working closely with pet owners to bring harmony back into the household.

May 26, 2012:“Veterinary Medicine Across the Pond”

Speaker: Dr. Nick Bacon

Ever wonder how the profession of veterinary medicine differs between countries? Dr. Nick Bacon, a small animal surgical oncologist and a native of the United Kingdom, returns to the show to talk about ways in which the profession is similar in the United States and the UF, as well as key differences in everything from becoming a veterinarian to the education process and veterinary practice.  The role animals in society will also be discussed.

May 19, 2012:“Vaccination Protocols”

Speaker: Dr. Amy Stone

There’s no doubt that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, as the saying goes. For pets, prevention of many major diseases is possible through a responsible vaccination schedule. Dr. Amy Stone, a primary care veterinarian, talks about why this is so, and shares information about recommended vaccination protocols. The good news is, many diseases really can be prevented by keeping your pet current on its shots and through effective communication with, and regular visits to, your veterinarian.

May 12, 2012:“The Geriatric Horse”

Speaker: Dr. Sarah Reuss

Horses have different health needs at different stages of their lives, just as people do. Dr. Sarah Reuss, a large animal internal medicine veterinarian, will discuss how horse owners can better understand, monitor and address these needs by working with their veterinarian.  Learn more about typical signs of aging in the horse, and what horse owners should always keep in mind as their horse ages.

May 5, 2012:“When to Seek Emergency Care for Your Pet”

Speaker: Dr. Carsten Bandt

If you’ve ever been faced with a pet emergency, you know how stressful this situation can be for all concerned. One of the best ways to ensure a positive outcome is by educating yourself about what constitutes a true emergency for your dog or cat. Learn more about how to detect signs your pet is in trouble and needs emergency care, and why immediate medical attention can make the difference between life and death

April 28, 2012:“Keeping Your Pet Safe in the Summer Months”

Speaker: Dr. Michael Schaer

Warmer weather means it’s time to pay more attention to environmental problems that could pose a threat to pets if not monitored. Insect bites, beach and water safety and  snake bite just a few problems veterinarians tend to see more of in the summer months. Learn how you can better enjoy the outdoors and longer days with your pets by playing it safe.

April 21, 2012:“A Global View of Veterinary Medicine”

Speaker: Dean Glen Hoffsis

When most of us think of veterinary medicine, we think of Fido and Fluffy and that person in the white they go to for their routine health check-ups. Whether you own small pets, horses or no animals at all, you are probably influenced in some way by the science and expertise taught in veterinary schools across the country. Glen Hoffsis, dean of the UF veterinary college, talks about how the profession contributes to animal, human and environmental health as well as trends seen today at veterinary colleges nationwide.

April 14, 2012: “The Role of the Food Animal Veterinarian in Food Safety”

Speaker: Dr. Carlos Risco

Back in the day, dairy veterinarians were called to the farm for “sick calls” concerning the health of individual animals. Today’s dairy veterinarians still tend to ill cattle, but they also work with many aspects of herd health and food safety. Among other things, this means carefully monitoring any drugs provided to animals, staying abreast of which antibiotics and other drugs are legal and working closely with farm owners on employee training as well as animal husbandry. Dr. Carlos Risco, a dairy extension veterinarian, will share information on these and other aspects of the food animal veterinarian’s role in animal well-being at the farm level.

April 7, 2012: “College of Veterinary Medicine Open House”

Speaker: Dr. Michael Schaer and Lacy Gilmer

The UF College of Veterinary Medicine’s annual Open House is a tradition in Gainesville. Learn what’s on tap for the upcoming Open House, scheduled for April 14, when Dr. Michael Schaer teams with veterinary student Lacy Gilmer to discuss the various activities, what goes into planning the event and what you can learn from it.

March 31, 2012: “Wildlife and Infectious Diseases”

Speaker: Dr. Jim Wellehan

Dr. Jim Wellehan, an expert in zoological medicine and veterinary microbiology, will discuss  some of the viruses he has helped identify in various marine mammal species, as well as how discoveries such as these shed light on the relationship between certain animal diseases and human disease. He will also talk about common health problems experienced in exotic pets.

March 24, 2012: “Laboratory Tests: What they Mean To Overall Pet Health”

Speaker: Dr. Heather Wamsley

“Testing, one, two, three….” When you visit the veterinarian, chances are you’ll be asked to have samples taken from your pet’s blood, urine and stool at some point to assess the animal’s overall health status. Learn more about what the most common tests are that take place in veterinary clinical pathology, and what they mean to you and your pet, when Dr. Heather Wamsley discusses this topic. Although the role of the clinical pathologist is behind the scenes, it is critical for disease diagnosis and prevention.

March 17, 2012: “Nutrition’s Role in Protecting Your Pet Against Disease”

Speaker: Dr. Rowan Milner

Proper nutritional management is essential for your pet to remain healthy and active. Nutrition plays an important role in influencing your pet’s susceptibility to a variety of disease, including cancer. Dr. Rowan Milner, a veterinary oncologist, will share information about why this is the case, the role and efficacy of nutritional supplements, and what pet owners should know about the relationship between diet and disease.

March 11, 2012: “Fishing line entanglement: danger for dolphins”

Speaker: Dr. Mike Walsh

An all-too-common cause of death in dolphins and other marine mammals  is improperly discarded fishing line. Dr. Mike Walsh will talk about why fishing line entanglement is such an important issue and what scientists and veterinarians are doing to help animals affected by this problem as well as efforts to expand overall awareness of the problem.

March 3, 2012: “What Foaling Season Means to Horse Breeders”

Speaker: Dr. Audrey Kelleman

Springtime is foaling season for horse breeders, but what exactly does that mean in terms of medical and nutritional management? Why is it important to have a veterinarian involved throughout the breeding process? Learn more about the common problems breeders encounter during foaling season and how veterinarians at the UF Large Animal Hospital work with horse owners to prevent problems from occurring in mares at various stages of pregnancy when Dr. Audrey Kelleman, a specialist in equine reproduction, shares her experience and insights.

Feb. 25, 2012 : “Shelter Medicine”

Speaker: Dr. Natalie Isaza

Did you know that spaying or neutering your pet can have important health benefits? Among those are eliminating the risk of many types of cancers affecting the reproductive systems of male and female animals. In addition, certain behaviors, such as aggressiveness and roaming, can be reduced through this type of surgery. Dr. Natalie Isaza, director of UF’s shelter animal medicine clerkship, will talk about the importance of spay/neuter procedures in offsetting disease as well as homelessness by keeping more animals from winding up in shelters.

Feb. 18, 2012: “Rehabilitation Rx for Horses”

Speaker: Dr. Ali Morton

No horse owner wants to encounter performance limiting injuries with their animal, but what can be done when this happens?  If surgery or advanced therapies are needed, what happens next?  Are there additional options  to promote recovery? Horses that compete in high-level performance events are prone to certain types of injuries for which rehabilitative therapy can be very helpful. UF equine surgeon Ali Morton talks about some of the methods veterinarians recommend for getting horses back on their feet, how and why they work, and how even high-tech treatment such as stem cell therapy is being used at the UF Large Animal Hospital to help horses regain strength and soundness after surgery or trauma.

Feb. 11, 2012: “An Ounce of Prevention is worth…..Your Pet’s Life?”

Speaker: Dr. Amy Stone

How can pet owners ensure their animal’s health and wellness, regardless of the pet’s age? Dr. Amy Stone will discuss the importance of head-to-tail physical examinations, early screening diagnostics, proper vaccines and current protocols, and regular veterinary examinations. Whether your pet is a puppy, a kitten, advanced in age or somewhere in between, routine wellness care is critical to prevent health problems from developing or worsening. Good communication with your veterinarian is key.

Feb. 4, 2012: “Heart Disease in Pets”

Speaker: Dr. Herb Maisenbacher

Diagnosing and treating heart disease in dogs and cats is as just as important as in humans to ensure a long and healthy life. Learn more about common heart problems affecting pets, as well as which diseases are preventable and what treatment options are available when problems do occur when Dr. Herb Maisenbacher shares his experience and insight about this topic. Dr. Maisenbacher will also discuss when the expertise offered by a veterinary specialist in heart disease can be of value in treating your pet.

Jan. 28, 2012: “Disc Disease and other Neurological Problems in Pets”

Speaker: Dr. Tom Schubert

The central nervous system includes the brain and the spinal cord, in pets just as in humans. The peripheral nervous system includes the nerves running through the body, affecting both voluntary and involuntary actions of the muscles. Any of these areas can be stricken with disease, but one of the most common seen by small animal veterinarians is paralysis, such as can be caused by a slipped disc — a disease that is particularly common in Dachshunds. Dr. Tom Schubert will talk about how UF veterinarians are now diagnosing and treating disc disease using technology such as lasers with positive results. He will also discuss current veterinary approaches for treating pets with seizures and sleep behavior disorder.

Jan. 21, 2012: “Venomous snake bite and other pet emergencies”

Speaker: Dr. Michael Schaer

Florida has many snakes, and only a few species are deadly. If and when your pet is bitten by a venomous snake, emergency veterinary care is imperative to save the pet’s life. How do you know if a snake is venemous? Should you ever bring a dead snake with you to the emergency veterinary clinic? Dr. Michael Schaer, an emergency and critical care specialist, will clarify what to do and not do in situations where pet owners suspect their animal has been bitten by a poisonous snake or by another venomous species.

Jan. 14, 2012: “Demystifying cancer in pets”

Speaker: Dr. Nick Bacon

Receiving a diagnosis that your pet has cancer can be frightening at many levels. How common is cancer in pets? What types of cancers are common in pets and what sorts of treatments exist for the various manifestations of this disease? Can an any types of cancer in animals be cured? Dr. Nick Bacon, an oncology surgeon, will share his considerable knowledge in this area with the goal of demystifying this subject and providing information that should prove valuable to any pet owner who is presently going through, or has ever been through, this experience with their animal.

Jan. 6, 2012: “Operation Catnip ”

Speaker: Dr. Julie Levy

Every community has feral cats, and controlling these feline populations can be a huge challenge. Operation Catnip, a nonprofit organization that offers free spay/neuter and vaccines for unowned, free-roaming community cats from the Alachua County area, has been in existence at UF since1998. Dr. Julie Levy, who founded the all-volunteer program, talks about how the program works, what its goals are and how you can become involved.

Dec. 31, 2011:  Station Holiday Programming

Dec. 24, 2011: “Best of Animal Airwaves from 2011”

Speaker: Various

Animal Airwaves will consist of a round-up of memorable audio clips from the many shows we have aired this past year. If you’re a fan of the show already, you’ll be reminded of why, and if you haven’t discovered the show yet, now’s a good time to start! You’ll hear from a variety of veterinary specialists who work with both large and small animals, all offering valuable educational tips and pet care information from their individual perspectives.

Dec. 17, 2011: “Eye Problems in Animals”

Speaker: Dr. Dennis Brooks

What are common eye problems that pets and other animals get? What sorts of problems are serious enough to justify calling your veterinarian? Dr. Dennis Brooks will talk about animal vision, including the ways in which animal eye problems are similar to and different than human eye problems, what your veterinarian looks for during routine eye checks and when veterinary ophthalmology specialists might need to become involved.

Dec. 10, 2011 : “Special Needs of Aging Pets”

Speaker: Dr. Wendy Mandese

One of the more difficult things about having a companion animal is that you must watch him or her age. As they age, dogs and cats experience many of the same physical and mental changes that humans do. They find it a little more difficult to get around, their vision deteriorates, and they get a little hard of hearing. Dr. Wendy Mandese, a primary care veterinarian, talks about what to expect when your pet ages and what you can do to ensure that Fido and Fluffy enjoy the best possible quality of life in their senior years, and why regular visits to your veterinarian are key.