Photos Tagged as 'Emerging Pathogens Institute'



UF Health Science Center and Shands at UF aerials

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Emerging Pathogens Institute. Photo by Jesse Jones/University of Florida

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UF Health Science Center and Shands at UF aerials

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Shands Medical Plaza, Davis Cancer Center, Emerging Pathogens Institute and Cancer Genetics Research Center. Photo by Jesse Jones/University of Florida

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UF Health Science Center and Shands at UF aerials

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Emerging Pathogens Institute and Cancer Genetics Research Center. Photo by Jesse Jones/University of Florida

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UF Health Science Center and Shands at UF aerials

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Emerging Pathogens Institute and Cancer Genetics Research Center. Photo by Jesse Jones/University of Florida

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Emerging Pathogens Institute ribbon-cutting

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Doctor Glenn Morris, alongside Univeristy of Florida President Bernie Machen, and deans from eight colleges, officially dedicate the Emerging Pathogens Institute with this ribbon-cutting ceremony.

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Emerging Pathogens Institute ribbon-cutting

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Dr. J. Glenn Morris, Jr.

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Dr. J. Glenn Morris Jr., the director of the University of Florida’s Emerging Pathogens Institute

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Gregory C. Gray, M.D., M.P.H.

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Gregory C. Gray, M.D., M.P.H., chair of UF's College of Public Health and Health Professions new department of environmental and global health.

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UF appoints founding chair of environmental and global health department

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HIV Graphic

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The gradient of colors indicate the estimated travel time to the nearest city with a population of more than 500,000, with yellow at one extreme indicating short travel times and red at the other extreme indicating long travel times. The graphic explains accessibility factors affecting the spread of HIV from central to east Africa. The virus was circulating at stable levels in the urban centers of the Democratic Republic of Congo, but these centers were isolated. Once the virus reached east Africa, connectivity between population centers combined with better quality transportation networks and higher rates of human movement caused HIV to spread exponentially. (Graphic provided by Andrew J. Tatem/University of Florida)

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Scientists join forces to explain HIV spread in Central and East Africa

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Marco Salemi

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An international team of researchers led by scientists at the University of Florida used genetic and geographic data to determine why HIV remained at stable levels in central Africa for about 20 years before exploding as an epidemic in west central Africa in the 1970s. By unraveling the forces that drive epidemics, medical professionals will be better able to deal with future outbreaks, according to Marco Salemi (center), an assistant professor in the department of pathology, immunology and laboratory medicine and member of the UF Genetics Institute; Rebecca Gray, a postdoctoral associate, and with Andrew Tatem, an assistant professor of geography and member of the Emerging Pathogens Institute. (Photo by Sarah Kiewel, University of Florida)

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Scientists join forces to explain HIV spread in Central and East Africa

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